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How Trial Closing And Closing Techniques Can Save You Time And Help You To Make More Sales

How Trial Closing And Closing Techniques Can Save You Time And Help You To Make More Sales

By:Doug Dvorak

doug-dvorak

No sales professional ever intends to get stuck in one sale for a longer period than required. They would like to move on to the next prospect after closing a sale as soon as possible. That’s the way to increase total sales volume. Closing techniques ensure that a sales conversation ends with a deal. Depending on the situation sales professionals implement any one or more of the several closing techniques that are generally used.

Trial Closing

Before finally sealing the deal sales persons also employ trial closing techniques to test the readiness of the prospect in buying the product or service. With a trial closing the interest of the prospect with regard to buying the product can be judged. A trial close is an attempt to determine how close the prospect is to actual closing. Trial closing is a low risk method of gauging the prospect’s opinion. It’s an opinion seeking tool and not a decision seeking one. Sales professionals use this technique to gauze the mood of the prospect and alter their presentations accordingly.

Without a trial closing a sales person may run in to trouble trying to close the deal. A negative answer to a close cannot turn into a positive one easily. A prospect may stick to his decision and defend it. A negative response to a trial closing on the other hand is just a signal for the sales person to change strategy. Sometimes a trial closing will actually result in a real close and even if it doesn’t it will let the sales person know when or what needs to be done to close the sale.

The best solution is to try trial closing once or many times before the actual closing. A positive trial close will indicate when the prospect is ready to buy and will automatically lead to a close.

Closing Techniques

Before finally sealing the deal sales persons also employ trial closing techniques to test the readiness of the prospect in buying the product or service. With a trial closing the interest of the prospect with regard to buying the product can be judged. A trial close is an attempt to determine how close the prospect is to actual closing. Trial closing is a low risk method of gauging the prospect’s opinion. It’s an opinion seeking tool and not a decision seeking one. Sales professionals use this technique to gauze the mood of the prospect and alter their presentations accordingly.

Without a trial closing a sales person may run in to trouble trying to close the deal. A negative answer to a close cannot turn into a positive one easily. A prospect may stick to his decision and defend it. A negative response to a trial closing on the other hand is just a signal for the sales person to change strategy. Sometimes a trial closing will actually result in a real close and even if it doesn’t it will let the sales person know when or what needs to be done to close the sale.

The best solution is to try trial closing once or many times before the actual closing. A positive trial close will indicate when the prospect is ready to buy and will automatically lead to a close.

About the Author:

Doug Dvorak helps companies and professionals achieve results through customized, creative and non-traditional sales training systems that are “one size fits one” and developed to the unique business needs and “sales pain points” of each client. He is available to speak on these topics.

For more information visit https://www.salescoach.us or call 847-359-6969 FREE

Permission is granted to reprint this article in print or on your web site as long as the paragraph above is included and contact information is provided.

Copyright 2008 The Sales Coaching Institute, Inc.

Sales Skills Training Strategic Sales Coaching

Doug Dvorak, CEO of DMG International, is the Author of the forthcoming book “Build Your Own Brand” (Pelican, 2009)

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